By the Koi Pond

Izzy posts fish

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sereeeh asked: Hey Izzy, what is the best tool for suctioning out poops, without doing a water change? My Platies and their fry poop so much. I suction up as much as I can during water change but when the new water goes in- I always find heaps that I missed. Thanks!

Poop. The eternal battle. Well that and algae. Unfortunately I know of no way to remove poop without siphoning it off. Maybe a bare-bottom tank would be better if you can’t get it all in one water change.

You guys have any ideas?

Filed under fish community text post fishblr

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griseus:

USING LIVING FISH TO STUDY ANCIENT EVOLUTIONARY CHANGES: How plasticity works in evolution race

Ambitious experimental and morphological studies of a modern fish show how developmental flexibility may have helped early ‘fishapods’ to make the transition from finned aquatic animals to tetrapods that walk on land.

The origin of tetrapods from their fish antecedents, approximately 400 million years ago, was coupled with the origin of terrestrial locomotion and the evolution of supporting limbs. Polypterus is a ray-finned fish (actinopterygians) and is pretty similar to elpistostegid fishes, which are stem tetrapods. Polypterus therefore serves as an extant analogue of stem tetrapods, allowing us to examine how developmental plasticity affects the ‘terrestrialization’ of fish. How else would you find out what behavioral and physiological changes might have taken place when fish first made the move from sea to land over 400 million years ago? putting a fish walking on land.
To find out exactly what might have happened when aquatic animals first moved to land, Researchers took 111 juvenile Polypterus senegalus a fish species that goes by the common name Senegal bichir, or “dinosaur eel" — and raised them for eight months in a terrestrial environment. This environment consisted of mesh flooring covered in pebbles and just 3 millimeters of water — a precaution that, combined with water misters, prevented the fish from drying out. The researchers also formed a control group using 38 fish growing up in their usual aquatic environment.

Dinosaur eels also have gills, but they breathe at the surface regularly to increase their oxygen supply. They also occasionally use their fins to walk on land. Results raise the possibility that environmentally induced developmental plasticity facilitated the origin of the terrestrial traits that led to tetrapods.

(via beatlebat)

Filed under bichir gif ichthyology

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rhamphotheca:

Sawfish Science in Florida
This just in — NOAA Fisheries Biologists Dr. John Carlson, Dana Bethea, Grace Casselbury and intern Ryan Jones are on their monthly expedition examining the distribution and abundance of smalltooth sawfish (Pristis pectinata), an ESA endangered species, in Everglades National Park. 
The scientists have recorded some extremely low salinity measurements this expedition and are measuring how the distribution of sawfish changes in response to low salinity. Today they tagged a 3 ft female near Chokoloskee Island. All of this research is designed to help implement recovery objectives in the ESA. 
Photo credit: Ryan Jones 
Check out our video on how we protect them: 
Protecting an Endangered Species:  Smalltooth Sawfish
(via: NOAA Fisheries)

rhamphotheca:

Sawfish Science in Florida

This just in — NOAA Fisheries Biologists Dr. John Carlson, Dana Bethea, Grace Casselbury and intern Ryan Jones are on their monthly expedition examining the distribution and abundance of smalltooth sawfish (Pristis pectinata), an ESA endangered species, in Everglades National Park.

The scientists have recorded some extremely low salinity measurements this expedition and are measuring how the distribution of sawfish changes in response to low salinity. Today they tagged a 3 ft female near Chokoloskee Island. All of this research is designed to help implement recovery objectives in the ESA.

Photo credit: Ryan Jones

Check out our video on how we protect them:

Protecting an Endangered Species:  Smalltooth Sawfish

(via: NOAA Fisheries)

(via ichthyologist)

Filed under sawfish conservation marine

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Fish raised on land give clues to how early animals left the seas (VIDEO)

Skeletons of primitive fish adapt as they take to land.

When raised on land, a primitive, air-breathing fish walks much better than its water-raised comrades, according to a new study. The landlubbers even undergo skeletal changes that improve their locomotion. The work may provide clues to how the first swimmers adapted to terrestrial life…

(Source: rhamphotheca, via ichthyologist)

Filed under video science ichthyology

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27. How many fish do you have?

The two goldfish in the 55 gal (which is still a mess from the move so no new shots).

There are 4 tetra and like 15? 20? loaches in the 29 gal. Those loaches are so hard to count. But I am pretty sure they all survived the move! Going to get some more tetra after I can find a job at UGA.

And then the koi pond, which I still consider to be mine even tho I’m not near it anymore. So that’s 6 med/large koi. I couldn’t chose between these photos so you guys get both.

Filed under text post WhatTheFishAugust my fish tank my photography koi pond

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rhamphotheca:

Bull Trout (Salvelinus confluentus)

Bull trout are members of the salmon family, in a group known as the char. Char are distributed farther north than any other group of freshwater fish exc

They can grow to more than 20 pounds in lake environments. Char are distinguished from trout and salmon by the absence of teeth in the roof of the mouth, presence of light colored spots on a dark background, absence of spots on the dorsal fin, small scales and differences in the structure of their skeleton.

To learn more about bull trout, visit: USFWS - Bull Trout

Filed under NANF trout