By the Koi Pond

Izzy posts fish

2,068 notes

iggymogo:



via lstarlet

My bees wouldn’t stay out of my dog’s watering bowl and not only were they annoying her but they were drowning in large numbers.
At first I tried using a bird bath and changed the water twice a week for my bees, but never saw them using it. I think it was too close to the hive (they like their water source to be a bit farther away from the hive) and the birds were always in it.
So then I turned a medium sized pot into a water garden with plants and a piece of wood for them to land on. The bees are loving it! Every time I have gone to check on it there are 20+ of them drinking. Since I have set up the garden I have not found a bee in the dog bowl.
As for preventing mosquitoes, I plan on ordering a few tadpoles or feeder fish.
Edit for pictures. http://imgur.com/a/jDKVi

iggymogo:

via lstarlet

My bees wouldn’t stay out of my dog’s watering bowl and not only were they annoying her but they were drowning in large numbers.

At first I tried using a bird bath and changed the water twice a week for my bees, but never saw them using it. I think it was too close to the hive (they like their water source to be a bit farther away from the hive) and the birds were always in it.

So then I turned a medium sized pot into a water garden with plants and a piece of wood for them to land on. The bees are loving it! Every time I have gone to check on it there are 20+ of them drinking. Since I have set up the garden I have not found a bee in the dog bowl.

As for preventing mosquitoes, I plan on ordering a few tadpoles or feeder fish.

(via zooophagous)

Filed under pond insect bee

26 notes

danidoroi:

Reef fish arrived in two waves, before and after mass extinction 66 million years ago

University of California - Davis
The world’s reefs are hotbeds of biological diversity, including over 4,500 species of fish. A new study shows that the ancestors of these fish colonized reefs in two distinct waves, before and after the mass extinction event about 66 million years ago that wiped out the dinosaurs. Reef fish represent one of the largest and most diverse assemblages of vertebrates, according to Samantha Price, a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Evolution and Ecology at UC Davis. Price is first author on a paper describing the work, published April 2 in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society BThe fossil record of reef fish is patchy, so Price and colleagues traced their ancestry by developing a comprehensive family tree of the major group of modern ocean fish, the acanthomorphs or “spiny-finned fish,” and calculating the times when different groups migrated into or out of reef habitats.
The first wave of colonization occurred between 70 and 90 million years ago, before the end of the Cretaceous period, they found. At that time, most the world’s reefs were built not by coral but by mollusks called rudists. Rudists disappeared in the mass extinction at the end of the Cretaceous, 66 million years ago, and corals became the world’s great reef builders. While the first-wave reef fish hung on to leave descendants in the present, a second wave of colonization took place as the world recovered from the extinction event.
The early wave of colonization began with lots of different-looking fish and over time there was an eventual filling of ecological niches accompanied by a decrease in colonization, Price said. By about 50 million years ago, the fundamentals of modern coral reefs, including the ancestors of most major families, such as clownfishes and parrotfishes, were in place, Price said.
"If you were able to dive on a coral reef 50 million years ago, the fishes would seem familiar, you would recognize it as similar to a modern reef," she said.
Source

danidoroi:

Reef fish arrived in two waves, before and after mass extinction 66 million years ago

University of California - Davis

The world’s reefs are hotbeds of biological diversity, including over 4,500 species of fish. A new study shows that the ancestors of these fish colonized reefs in two distinct waves, before and after the mass extinction event about 66 million years ago that wiped out the dinosaurs. Reef fish represent one of the largest and most diverse assemblages of vertebrates, according to Samantha Price, a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Evolution and Ecology at UC Davis. Price is first author on a paper describing the work, published April 2 in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society BThe fossil record of reef fish is patchy, so Price and colleagues traced their ancestry by developing a comprehensive family tree of the major group of modern ocean fish, the acanthomorphs or “spiny-finned fish,” and calculating the times when different groups migrated into or out of reef habitats.

The first wave of colonization occurred between 70 and 90 million years ago, before the end of the Cretaceous period, they found. At that time, most the world’s reefs were built not by coral but by mollusks called rudists. Rudists disappeared in the mass extinction at the end of the Cretaceous, 66 million years ago, and corals became the world’s great reef builders. While the first-wave reef fish hung on to leave descendants in the present, a second wave of colonization took place as the world recovered from the extinction event.

The early wave of colonization began with lots of different-looking fish and over time there was an eventual filling of ecological niches accompanied by a decrease in colonization, Price said. By about 50 million years ago, the fundamentals of modern coral reefs, including the ancestors of most major families, such as clownfishes and parrotfishes, were in place, Price said.

"If you were able to dive on a coral reef 50 million years ago, the fishes would seem familiar, you would recognize it as similar to a modern reef," she said.

Source

Filed under marine ichthyology

135 notes

goldfishgal:

Colorado Parks and Wildlife staff attempt to remove a population of goldfish from a lake. - Source

Don’t release your unwanted pet into the wild.
Don’t buy a fish with the intent of “freeing” them.
It’s not good for the fish and it’s not good for the environment.
Don’t do it.
Don’t.

Look at all these “trash” fish. They were electroshocked to be hauled away. Don’t let your poor decision-making lead to stuff like this.

(via aquariadise)

Filed under goldfish conservation

32 notes

Harley the lobster is one-in-50-million!
Harley Quinn the lobster was named after the medieval jesters famed for their bi-coloured costumes. The similarity is enhanced by the fact that Harley’s unusual pigmentation swaps sides when it reaches his claws.He was found by a startled creel fisherman off Bridlington in June 2010, and rightly judged too unique to be served up as a seafood supper!He was given pride-of-place in a display at Scarborough Sea Life Centre, where staff have been serving him dinner every day since instead.Growing steadily, Harley has just shed his unique armour for the second time since his arrival, and his keepers were delighted to see that his new suit is his most spectacular yet!"Whereas he was previously a reddish-black on one side and light sandy colour on the other, he has now adopted a deep electric blue down one side," said aquarist Amy McFarlane.
(Read more) PFK     |||     Photo credit: Scarborough Sea Life Centre

Harley the lobster is one-in-50-million!

Harley Quinn the lobster was named after the medieval jesters famed for their bi-coloured costumes. The similarity is enhanced by the fact that Harley’s unusual pigmentation swaps sides when it reaches his claws.

He was found by a startled creel fisherman off Bridlington in June 2010, and rightly judged too unique to be served up as a seafood supper!

He was given pride-of-place in a display at Scarborough Sea Life Centre, where staff have been serving him dinner every day since instead.

Growing steadily, Harley has just shed his unique armour for the second time since his arrival, and his keepers were delighted to see that his new suit is his most spectacular yet!

"Whereas he was previously a reddish-black on one side and light sandy colour on the other, he has now adopted a deep electric blue down one side," said aquarist Amy McFarlane.

(Read more) PFK     |||     Photo credit: Scarborough Sea Life Centre

Filed under lobster ocean oddities weird sea