By the Koi Pond

Izzy posts fish

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ichthyologist:

Bichir
Bichirs are a primitive group of fish that are considered by some to be the evolutionary link between amphibians and fish. Their jaw structure more closely resembles that of the tetrapods compared to ray-finned fishes. Additionally, they possess a pair of lungs which allow them to breathe atmospheric air.
(Polypterus senegalus depicted)
Elma via Wikimedia Commons

ichthyologist:

Bichir

Bichirs are a primitive group of fish that are considered by some to be the evolutionary link between amphibians and fish. Their jaw structure more closely resembles that of the tetrapods compared to ray-finned fishes. Additionally, they possess a pair of lungs which allow them to breathe atmospheric air.

(Polypterus senegalus depicted)

Elma via Wikimedia Commons

Filed under bichir oddball

5 notes

Anonymous asked: HELP! I got a 20 gal tank a filter heater, moss ball and a Jungle Val plant. I used Tetra's starter kit to condition the water and add bacteria to it. I got 2 Platies 1 Guppy 1 Molly. Before I put them in the tank I tested the water the only problem was the pH little higher than I wanted. All fish are fine except for the Molly who spends a lot of time at the top of the tank gulping air. He also swims kinda vertical sometimes. I'm worried about him. I'm new to aquariums and don't know what to do.

Hello! First things first. Relax. Aquariums are about patience. The second thing you need to do is test for ammonia. What you are going through now is called “new tank syndrome” otherwise known as establishing the nitrogen cycle.

Fish excrete ammonia as a waste product, and it’s also toxic. This is all well and good in the wild because there is enough water to dilute it, but not in an aquarium. Aquariums rely on two colonies of beneficial bacteria to convert this ammonia first into nitrite (also harmful) and then into nitrate (much less harmful).

You’re at the beginning stages of this. That bacteria in a bottle is not an “instant cycle” like it claims. Establishing a cycle typically takes a month because the beneficial bacteria replicate quite slowly. If you test for ammonia, you’ll likely see it present. After you are done with that, do a 50% water change adding dechlorinator back to the water. The gasping behavior in your molly is indicative of ammonia poisoning. Removing the ammonia is the best thing you can do right now.

Once that is done, I highly suggest you read up on cycling an aquarium. Here are some links to get you started:

http://www.fishlore.com/NitrogenCycle.htm

http://www.aquahobby.com/articles/e_ciclo.php

http://www.practicalfishkeeping.co.uk/content.php?sid=2491

http://www.kevinbush.com/cycling/the-fish-in-cycle/

Best of luck with your new tank! Let me know if you need any more help.

7 notes

Happy Earth Day, everyone. But really we should be thinking about what we do that affects the environment and how we can lessen that impact every single day. Turning off lights and recycling shouldn’t be something we just do today; it should be something we do every day.

This hobby is sometimes accused of being less environmentally friendly than others. The truth is we do use a lot of water and electricity, but there are things we can do to mitigate those effects. Don’t just throw the water down the drain; water your yard or houseplants with it. Set timers on your aquarium lights so they aren’t left on for too long if you forget one night (also helps cut down algae growth).

This day was originally meant to raise awareness about the issues facing our home. The awareness is there; it’s now time to take action and implement these things on a daily basis. Make earth day into earth life.

Filed under fish community earth day

14 notes

fishgoddess:

At first glance, this large fish may look like a shark. But upon further inspection, it is actually a cobia (Rachycentron canadum), a worldwide species that is the only specie of its family. Although these fish can grow up to 6’7” (2 m), they longer around larger fish for food scraps and protection, like its relatives, the remoras (family Echeneidae). Cobia are often found around the surface of the water in open waters near boats or floating shelter. They will take a hook baited with almost any bait.
Photo credit Teo, C. on Flickr.com

fishgoddess:

At first glance, this large fish may look like a shark. But upon further inspection, it is actually a cobia (Rachycentron canadum), a worldwide species that is the only specie of its family. Although these fish can grow up to 6’7” (2 m), they longer around larger fish for food scraps and protection, like its relatives, the remoras (family Echeneidae). Cobia are often found around the surface of the water in open waters near boats or floating shelter. They will take a hook baited with almost any bait.

Photo credit Teo, C. on Flickr.com

Filed under marine